A Simple Investigation into the Stability of Lightweight Motorcycle

Authors

  • Chuthamat Laksanakit Prince of Songkla University
  • Pichai Taneerananoon Prince of Songkla University
  • Kitti Wichettapong Khon Kaen University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4186/ej.2016.20.2.199

Keywords:

Motorcycle, stability, smartphone, motorcycle tyre width, straight running test.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate the stability of lightweight motorcycle in straight path running test. The stability of three different tyre dimensions was measured using acceleration, angular velocity and vehicle speed signals from smartphone sensors. The signals were analyzed to determine whether standard configuration of tyres used in lightweight motorcycles in various developing countries are safe in terms of vehicle stability. In order to identify effects of tyre width on driving stability, forward speed, angular acceleration and rotational velocity were measured. These measurements are valuable empirical data in the understanding of motorcycle balance mechanism. Results of analysis show that for the range of tyre width 70 mm to 110 mm for the front and 80 mm to 120 mm for the rear wheel used in the test, motorcycle stability is not affected by the tyre width for the straight path run with maximum speed of 60 km/h.

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Author Biographies

Chuthamat Laksanakit

Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Prince of Songkla University Hatyai, Songkhla 90110 Thailand

Pichai Taneerananoon

Euro-Asia Road Safety Centre of Excellence, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Prince of Songkla University Hatyai, Songkhla 90110 Thailand

Kitti Wichettapong

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

Published

Vol 20 No 2, May 18, 2016

How to Cite

[1]
C. Laksanakit, P. Taneerananoon, and K. Wichettapong, “A Simple Investigation into the Stability of Lightweight Motorcycle”, Eng. J., vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 199-210, May 2016.

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