Properties of Pervious Concrete Aiming for LEED Green Building Rating System Credits

  • Than Mar Swe Chulalongkorn University
  • Pitcha Jongvivatsakul Chulalongkorn University
  • Withit Pansuk Chulalongkorn University

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Abstract

Pervious concrete is a special type of concrete with high porosity. The use of pervious concrete may achieve many potential LEED green building rating system credits. The objective of this paper is to investigate the appropriate mix proportion which provides the high LEED points and also the good mechanical properties. Nine mix proportions based on possible LEED points were examined. The replacement of cement by fly ash (20% - 60%) and coarse aggregate by recycled aggregate (20% - 100%) were used. Properties of pervious concrete relating to LEED credits and design values such as permeability, void content, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength were evaluated. It was found that the proposed pervious concrete can achieve the stormwater design-quantity control, recycled content and recycled materials credits. According to the results, the mix proportions which cement was replaced by 40% and 60% of fly ash archived the highest LEED credit points and also provided the sufficient mechanical properties. Therefore, these mix proportions are recommended for green construction.

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Author Biographies
Than Mar Swe

Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand

Pitcha Jongvivatsakul

Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand

Withit Pansuk

Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand

Published
Vol 20 No 2, May 18, 2016
How to Cite
T. Swe, P. Jongvivatsakul, and W. Pansuk, “Properties of Pervious Concrete Aiming for LEED Green Building Rating System Credits”, Eng. J., vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 61-72, May 2016.

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