Outdoor-Indoor Atmospheric Corrosion in a Coastal Wind Farm Located in a Tropical Island

  • Abel Abelito Castañeda National Center for Scientific Research
  • Francisco Corvo Corrosion Research Center
  • Dainerys Fernández National Center for Scientific Research
  • Cecilia Valdés National Center for Scientific Research

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Abstract

Atmospheric corrosion is important to consider for energy production and transmission. Important and valuable information have been accumulated in this subject; however, the application of new knowledge obtained is not completed. In order to contribute to a decrease in economic losses caused by atmospheric corrosion in wind farms, studies toward application of this knowledge should be carried out. One of the most common reasons for the failure of coastal structures and infrastructures is deterioration failure which is the result of structure deterioration and lack of project maintenance. Atmospheric corrosion was evaluated at outdoor and indoor exposure sites located at different distances from the sea in a wind farm region. Carbon and galvanized steel, copper and aluminum specimens were exposed. Main pollutants and atmospheric parameters were measured. Significant differences between outdoor corrosivity determined by dose response functions established on ISO standard respecting direct weight loss evaluation were found. Estimation carried out using dose response functions overestimate corrosivity (excepting copper). Main factors causing outdoor corrosion are different to indoor. Very high outdoor and indoor corrosivity classifications were determined.

Author Biographies
Abel Abelito Castañeda

National Center for Scientific Research, Havana City, Cuba

Francisco Corvo

Corrosion Research Center, University of Campeche, P.O. Box. 24030, Campeche, Mexico

Dainerys Fernández

National Center for Scientific Research, Havana City, Cuba

Cecilia Valdés

National Center for Scientific Research, Havana City, Cuba

Keywords
Atmospheric corrosion, carbon steel, copper, aluminum, wind farm.

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